CURRENT LAB MEMBERS

PhD

Hanna Scheuffele (PhD, commenced 2018)

Deakin University, Geelong, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr Fredrik Jutfelt

Hanna's project investigates the physiological mechanisms underlying the 'temperature-size rule' phenomenon, whereby aquatic organisms like fishes cannot grow as large in warmer waters. Click here for more info!

ALUMNI LAB MEMBERS

Visiting Postdocs

Josefin Sundin (visited 2015)

Home institute: Uppsala University, Sweden

Josefin conducted a collaborative project to investigate the effects of elevated dissolved carbon dioxide (ocean acidification) on the behaviour and physiology of coral reef fish.

Mirjam Amcoff (visited 2015)

Home institute: Stockholm University, Sweden

Mirjam conducted a collaborative project to investigate the effects of elevated dissolved carbon dioxide (ocean acidification) on the behaviour and physiology of coral reef fish.

Fernando Mateos-González (visited 2015)

Home institute: University of Texas (Austin), USA

Fernando conducted a collaborative project to investigate the effects of elevated dissolved carbon dioxide (ocean acidification) on the behaviour and physiology of coral reef fish.

Graham Raby (visited 2015)

Home institute: University of Windsor, Canada

Graham visited on an Endeavour Postdoctoral Fellowship to investigate the effects of elevated dissolved carbon dioxide (ocean acidification) on the behaviour and physiology of coral reef fish.

PhD

Alyssa Bowden (PhD, completed 2018)

University of Tasmania and CSIRO, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr Sarah Andrewartha, Dr Nick Elliott, Prof Peter Frappell

Alyssa's thesis investigated the interaction between temperature and amoebic gill disease (AGD) in Atlantic salmon, with a particular focus on understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying performance decrements in AGD-infected salmon.

Andrew Wood (PhD, completed 2018)

University of Tasmania and CSIRO, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr Sarah Andrewartha, Dr Nick Elliott, Prof Peter Frappell

Andrew's thesis investigated the impacts of developmental hypoxia on the physiology and long-term performance of Atlantic salmon, with application to natural rearing environments and aquaculture facilities.

Katharina Alter (PhD, completed 2017)

University of Tasmania and CSIRO, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr Sarah Andrewartha, Dr Nick Elliott, Prof Peter Frappell

Katharina's thesis investigated the physiological and behavioural mechanisms underlying improved growth performance and environmental tolerance in hybrid abalone compared with pure-bred blacklip and greenlip species.

Geoffrey Collins (PhD, completed 2017)

Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr A. Guy Carton, Prof Dean Jerry

Geoffrey's thesis investigated the intraspecific diversity of hypoxia tolerance across populations of the iconic barramundi, to understand the potential for acclimation and adaptation to increasingly hypoxic coastal waterways.

Vinay Udyawer (PhD, completed 2016)

Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr Michelle Heupel, Prof Colin Simpfendorfer

Vinay's thesis investigated the spatial ecology and energetics of tropical sea snakes using acoustic telemetry and bi-modal respirometry, with a particular aim to understand temporal and spatial interactions with commercial fisheries.

Ian McLeod (PhD, completed 2014)

Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University, Australia

Co-supervisors: Prof Geoffrey Jones, Prof Philip Munday, Dr Jodie Rummer

Ian's thesis investigated the interaction between temperature and food availability on the growth rates and survival of larval coral reef fishes, particularly with regard to latitudinal temperature gradients.

Tommy Norin (PhD, completed 2013)

Australian Institute of Marine Science and Aarhus University, Denmark

Co-supervisors: Dr Hans Malte

Tommy's thesis investigated intraspecific and interindividual metabolic diversity in fishes, to understand whether particular metabolic phenotypes have superior performance under challenging environmental conditions.

MSc

Thomas Schmitt (MSc, completed 2017)

University of Melbourne, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr John Morrongiello

Thomas' thesis investigated the 'pace-of-life' syndrome (i.e., live fast, die young) by examining the interplay between growth, metabolism and behaviour in juvenile brown trout.

Alison Collins (MSc, completed 2012)

University of British Columbia, Canada

Co-supervisors: Prof Scott Hinch

Alison's thesis investigated the impacts of intraperitoneal implantation of acoustic tags on the swimming performance of juvenile sockeye salmon, to help refine models that use acoustic tag data in assessments of salmon ecology and productivity.

Honours

Pasang Tenzing (BSc (Hons), completed 2014)

Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University, Australia

Co-supervisors: Dr Michelle Heupel, Prof Colin Simpfendorfer

Pasang's thesis investigated the interaction between water temperature and digestive performance in tropical stingrays, to provide physiological explanations for the daily movement patterns of stingrays in coastal mangrove habitats.

Georgia McGee (BSc (Hons), completed 2013)

Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University, Australia

Co-supervisors: Prof Mark McCormick

Georgia's thesis investigated the role of temperature in regulating the inflation response of black-saddled pufferfish, to understand how ocean warming may impact the unusual predator defence strategy of these charismatic fish.

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Timothy Clark

T:  +61 (0) 3 9244 6035

E:  t.clark@deakin.edu.au

Deakin University

75 Pigdons Road, Geelong, Australia 3216